UPDATED: Here’s How You Can Still Enjoy the O.C. Arts Scene While Social Distancing

You can continue to enjoy the arts scene in Orange County in virtually ways without violating social distancing. Many venues offer views of their works as well as virtual classes and videos you can enjoy from home. Here’s what some local venues are doing.

Read: More on cellist Warren Hagerty here!

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✨ Announcing OCMA virtual programming ✨ As we all stay in, OCMA is helping make our homes a site of creativity and inspiration. Beginning next week, every Thursday the museum will roll out original virtual programs—starting with a new take on our ongoing Cinema Orange screening series. For nearly two decades, OCMA and @newportbeachfilmfest have brought you independent films from around the globe through a free monthly series at the museum. Now, as we look for ways to engage our audiences during a time of social distancing, we’re screening films in your home! Next Thursday, April 2, enjoy a sneak preview of “Ursula Von Rydingsvard: Into Her Own,” a compelling documentary portrait that explores the life and work of the artist. This film will be available to watch anytime between 5-11pm PST. RSVP at ocmaexpand.org/programs to receive access. Image © “Ursula Von Rydingsvard: Into Her Own” #MuseumFromHome

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The "At Home with the Hilbert Museum" series continues — hope you all are well and safe, and hope that we're able to bring you some happiness, enjoyment and escape during these trying times! From our current "Los Angeles Area Scene Paintings" exhibition: Ernie Barnes Jr. (1938-2009), "No Tours," c. 1960, oil on canvas. Gift of the Hilbert Collection to the Hilbert Museum of California Art. Ernie Barnes Jr. was a gifted American scene painter best-known for his paintings of people with elongated limbs and torsos caught at the height of bold motion. Born during the Jim Crow era in North Carolina, Barnes grew up sketching scenes of his own African American community while attending segregated schools. He became captain of his high school football team and won a full athletic scholarship to North Carolina College. He was drafted by the Baltimore Colts in 1959, and later played for the San Diego Chargers and Denver Broncos from 1960-64, before closing out his pro football career with the Canadian Football League. Throughout his football career and after, Barnes continued drawing and painting. His paintings of athletes — football players, basketball players in particular — are perhaps his best known works. But Barnes also pictured the everyday scene — such as this painting showing a variety of stories happening backstage at a motion-picture shoot in Hollywood. The "No Tours Beyond This Point" sign — from which the painting takes its name — refers to the practice of many movie studios that offer public tours…which stop short of going to sets where filming is occurring. But as you can see, there's a lot happening here in this studio that has nothing to do with filming! How many funny human stories can you pick out in this painting? #hilbertmuseum #hilbertmuseumofcaliforniaart #california #hollywood #erniebarnesjr #erniebarnes #californiaartists #californiaart #art #paintings #museums #artmuseums #artgalleries #sportsart #movieart #movies #movieindustry #moviestudios #africanamericanart #africanamericanartists #blackartists #chapmanuniversity #chapmanu

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