Artist Kerri Sabine-Wolf Pairs Beauty & Beastliness to Make her Point

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Kerri Sabine-Wolf
Kerri Sabine-Wolf. Photo by Priscilla Iezzi.

Sabine-Wolf likes transformations. The Tustin home of this self-confessed “butterfly wrangler” is in the path of a migratory trek. Once sitting in her yard for hours watching a chrysalis turn black, she marveled at the vulnerability of the insect inside. Phones ringing, kids screaming, she continued to watch, until the butterfly broke through its protective housing and flew away. As an artist, she defines herself as a “contemporary realist,” and a glance at her work—often surreal, stunning, with an occasional dark undercurrent—indicates she has nailed that description. “Target Practice” is her visceral scream against gun violence. A gun-owner friend of Sabine-Wolf’s shot at the target, the bullets getting closer and closer to the monarch in the center, until a sixth shot put it out of commission. The viciousness of the moment is represented by spattered smears of black, as if someone flattened the insect and then wiped it across the canvas. “As a mother, as a parent, you can’t not think about it,” she says. “It’s not going to stop us—me, my husband, my kids—from going out into the world. But it’s heartbreaking that you have to consider it.”

“Target Practice” (2016), oil on paper, bullet holes made with a 9 mm handgun, 9 by 9 inches. Contact Sabine-Wolf at thepaintedwall@sbcglobal.net for more information.
“Target Practice” (2016), oil on paper, bullet holes made with a 9 mm handgun, 9 by 9 inches. Contact Sabine-Wolf at thepaintedwall@sbcglobal.net for more information.

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