Tastemaker: Designer Cynthia Vincent on What’s Next

cynthia-vincent-headshot_bw-copyDesigner Cynthia Vincent, the unofficial queen of boho chic, has cut a fresh silhouette for herself. An early force behind the label Vince, she also spent 12 years helming her own company, Twelfth Street by Cynthia Vincent, before moving on to consulting. She has collaborated with two O.C. brands, has a hotly anticipated home line in the works, and another collaboration that involves city pride-inspired gifts.

Your recent projects came out of a difficult time. Twelfth Street was sold in 2015 and the investment firm brought in a new team. Was there a silver lining?

My new consulting firm! I formed it because a lot of companies needed answers because (the fashion) business has changed so much. One client wanted creative direction, another wanted color and print direction, and one just wanted help fitting garments.
One client was Garden Grove-based Three Dots, where you came in as a consultant but took on the role of temporary creative director.

One client was Garden Grove-based Three Dots, where you came in as a consultant but took on the role of temporary creative director. How did you help reshape a company known for premium T-shirts?
My aim was to deliver more fashion to the brand. I went through the archives and focused on head-to-toe knit dressing, since it’s the core of the company (knit dresses, velvet camisoles, sweaters with shoulder cut‑outs). It was also about reintroducing that T-shirt to a whole generation, like today’s style bloggers. I sent T-shirts to bloggers who weren’t familiar with it and just said, “Hey, let us know what you think.” And the response was amazing.

Cynthia Vincent’s Three Dots pieces for spring include the red off-shoulder T, $88; tie-front dress, $124; lace T, $118.

How did you help reshape a company known for premium T-shirts?
My aim was to deliver more fashion to the brand. I went through the archives and focused on head-to-toe knit dressing, since it’s the core of the company (knit dresses, velvet camisoles, sweaters with shoulder cut‑outs). It was also about reintroducing that T-shirt to a whole generation, like today’s style bloggers.I sent T-shirts to bloggers who weren’t familiar with it and just said, “Hey, let us know what you think.”And the response was amazing.

You also collaborated with O’Neill last year for the surf brand’s 60th anniversary, infusing the line with breezy caftans and wet suits with floral artwork. Is it tricky introducing fashion to an action sportswear company?

No! That team was so on it, and they knew their fashion. They aren’t just a sports company. They’re so well‑prepared.

Tell us more about your home line.

It’s called Home & Away, and it launches in spring. I’m working with artisans from around the world to create everything from tabletop pieces to metalwork, home fragrance, and much more.

You’re collaborating with Sisters of Los Angeles (SoLA), the city pridelifestyle brand. Will we see Orange
County products?

Definitely. I am looking to bring my bohemian spirit to the line with new totes, candles, matches, and more, from the Laguna- and Newport Beach‑branded collections to the “714” rocks glasses. Now, more than ever, we need positivity and light, and in a small way this fun collaboration brings that to people.

What inspires a fashion designer to launch a home collection?

I wanted to create things that I love and that I have always wanted to tap into but never fit into the contemporary clothing model.

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Vincent’s wet suit and floral surfboard for O’Neill.

Do you have a design ethos?

Whether I’m designing clothes or home products, my criteria is thatI want it to have a lasting value, and that’s something I’m proud of with my clothing. I hear from a lot of people who still have a special dress or pieceof mine (from Twelfth Street) that they’ve had for years.

Where can we find your home line and city pride items?

A’maree’s, for the home line, and the city pride collaboration will be at Yolk Laguna Beach.

 

 

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